Sunday, October 18, 2009

Palin: Good Intentions Aren't Enough with Health Care Reform

Now that the Senate Finance Committee has approved its health care bill, it's a good time to step back and take a look at the long term consequences should its provisions be enacted into law.

...Those driving this plan no doubt have good intentions, but good intentions aren't enough. There were good intentions behind the drive to increase home ownership for lower-income Americans, but forcing financial institutions to give loans to people who couldn't afford them had terrible unintended consequences. We all felt those consequences during the financial collapse last year. Unintended consequences always result from top-down big government plans like the current health care proposals, and we can't afford to ignore that fact again.

...The plan will also impose heavy taxes on insurers, pharmaceutical companies, medical device companies, and clinical labs. [3] The result of all of these taxes is clear. As Douglas Holtz-Eakin noted in the Wall Street Journal, these new taxes "will be passed on to consumers by either directly raising insurance premiums, or by fueling higher health-care costs that inevitably lead to higher premiums."
[4] Unfortunately, it will lead to lower wages too, as employees will have to sacrifice a greater percentage of their paychecks to cover these higher premiums. [5] In other words, if the Democrats succeed in overhauling health care, we'll all bear the costs. The Senate Finance bill is effectively a middle class tax increase, and as Holtz-Eakin points out, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation those making less than $200,000 will be hit hardest. [6]

...All of this certainly gives the appearance of politics-as-usual in Washington with no change in sight. 
Americans want health care reform because we want affordable health care. We don't need subsidies or a public option. We don't need a nationalized health care industry. We need to reduce health care costs. But the Senate Finance plan will dramatically increase those costs, all the while ignoring common sense cost-saving measures like tort reform. Though a Congressional Budget Office report confirmed that reforming medical malpractice and liability laws could save as much as $54 billion over the next ten years, tort reform is nowhere to be found in the Senate Finance bill.

Here's a novel idea. Instead of working contrary to the free market, let's embrace the free market. Instead of going to war with certain private sector companies, let's embrace real private-sector competition and allow consumers to purchase plans across state lines. Instead of taxing the so-called "Cadillac" plans that people get through their employers, let's give individuals who purchase their own health care the same tax benefits we currently give employer-provided health care recipients. Instead of crippling Medicare, let's reform it by providing recipients with vouchers so that they can purchase their own coverage.

Now is the time to make your voices heard before it's too late. If we don't fight for the market-oriented, patient-centered, and result-driven reform plan that we deserve, we'll be left with the disastrous unintended consequences of the plans currently being cooked up in Washington.

- Sarah Palin


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